Thursday, April 22, 2010

Bring Ray's Artwork Into Your Home...

Click the link below to choose from more than two dozen painting by Ray Matthews.

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

April 21, 2010

I sat down last night and read all the comments you wrote to this site and to Ray's email (, and was as moved by those as you were by our interview. Thank you, thank you. It was also wonderful to hear from people I have not connected with in years. (On that note, I wonder if the anthropologist who was at the opening is still checking into this website. If so, please email me at Ray's.)

A friend of Ray's has uploaded a lot of new photographs of his paintings onto this site, so please go to PRINTS and scroll down. The dimensions of each work will be added by Monday, April 26th. (This is definitely a learning curve.) Ray and I hope that we have priced the paintings so that with a tiny stretch most of you will find them affordable. (The photographs do not do justice to the brilliant colors.)

If you want a PRINT, and it is not listed as a print, please email Ray Mary Ann Steinis and let her know which ones interest you, and we can easily have that particular made into a print. It might take two to three weeks to ship, as these will be printed to order.

Prints can be shipped framed (by Mary Anne) or rolled up and sent. Also, you will see that some of the oils were framed for the exhibit and look fantastic. The framing done at Framer's Art and Gallery is exceptional. ( I will write about the art of framing in another blog.

Ray is painting every day now, and if you want to see new works, please send him an email, and I will get photos to you. We would appreciate your comments on which paintings speak to you.

The goal remains to get Ray and his mom Rose into a more comfortable living situation, which I am investigating. Ray's dream is to have a computer, and we hope that in the future that will be possible.

I'll be back soon. Enjoy browsing original and prints under "Prints." To turn the music off, hit the far left part of the bar.

Keep those comments coming! We are learning from you!


Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Successful Gallery Opening!

I wanted everyone to know that the opening of Ray's exhibit was a big success, with 120 attendees, and paintings and prints sold. Ray was ecstatic. We plan to have paintings and prices uploaded by the end of the week. You can also email me: to ask about various paintings and prices, and I can also put you in touch with Ray.

Please be patient, Janet

Friday, April 16, 2010


Meet Ray

at a wine and cheese reception

Sat. April 17, 2010

4:00-7:00 p.m.

Framer's Market and Gallery (Ram's Plaza)

1728 Fordham Blvd., Chapel Hill, NC 27514


"Main Street"
The Award-winning Painting

Janet Hubbard

To purchase Ray's GICLEE PRINTS, contact: MaryAnne 919-929-7137 or


Listen to Ray Matthew and Janet Hubbard's interview
from Thursday, April 15, 2010
Ray Matthew's and Janet Hubbard on the nationally syndicated
"The Story with Dick Gordon"


(Once on "The Story" website, scroll down & click play)



Ray's entire portfolio will be up by Monday, April 26, 2010.
In the meantime, to purchase Ray's Giclee prints of paintings CONTACT: MaryAnne or Kathleen of Framer's Market & Gallery 919-929-7137 or email:

Thursday, April 15, 2010

Ray's NPR Interview on "The Story"

Ray Matthews and Janet Hubbard share how
their unexpected partnership has jump started Ray's art career.


(Once on "The Story" website, scroll down & click play)

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

April 14, 2010

For those who are planning to attend the opening of Ray's exhibit on Saturday, April 17th, from 4 to 7 p.m., the GPS address is:

Framers Market and Gallery
1728 Fordham Blvd., Chapel Hill, NC
TEL: 919-929-7137

Today I am thinking about "The Transcending Power of Art."

Now that Ray and I are going to be on NPR this Thursday the 15th, and friends from California to Vermont have been notified via email, I am stopping for a moment before the show is on the air to think about what this means to me. The woman who is producing our interview at WUNC, Anita Woodley, called at 8 this morning to check on a fact, and only then did I think, this interview will be heard by thousands. (The Story with Dick Gordon gets over 80,000 hits a month!) Dick and Anita and the other producers do this every day, but remember that Ray does not have a car that will get him to Richmond to the doctor, nor do he and his mother have a telephone that is active more than a few hours each month. Their typical outing over the past decade is to the supermarket a mile away.

On Saturday, Ray will have an opening of his exhibit in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. I will pick his mother and him up at 2:30 in South Hill, and hopefully my 92-year-old mother will come along (one of Ray's fans) and we will drive the hour and a half to the gallery. Ray's mother's vision will hopefully be restored on the 20th, but on the "big day" she will not be able to see the paintings.

I am in as much awe as anyone who hears the story about how all of this unfolded. Perhaps this is why my eyes welled with tears when Dick Gordon asked me on the show what Ray and his mom Rose have given me (I'm paraphrasing). I was tongue-tied at that moment (actually, I was too emotional to give a rational response). When I saw Ray's painting in the empty store-front window last year, I wanted to own one of his paintings. When I met him, and his mother Rose, and became a witness to their lifestyle, I was appalled. I wanted to help, but help, to me, implies rescuing through an act of pity. I began to see myself as a vehicle, not as a rescuer.

Maybe I wanted others to share what I experienced while looking at the painting "Main Street" that day when I felt my heart open. Then, when I went to Ray's and his mother Rose's apartment, and saw how dark and bleak the interior was, I could not believe the vitality in the paintings. The color, the movement, the light. I thought about how they transcended the physical darkness.

The next thing that strikes me is the sense of joy this experience has brought to all of us who have stepped in, either to buy a painting, or to voice encouragement, or to do bigger things. There were others before me. I met the pharmacist who had bought several paintings over the years, and a former bookstore owner in South Hill (now 85) who owns five of Ray's paintings. I laugh when I think of store owner Jimmy Martin who we talk about on The Story. He was struggling himself I found out later, but he still gave Ray a hundred dollars for the painting that would stir my interest and go on to win a juried art show award. We have become good friends, and I love to enter his store and hear him telling "the story." A gentleman in his store said to me one day recently, "You must be an intellectual to have known that was a good painting." I decided not to launch into how I responded with my heart.

Ray and I feel that the exhibit on Saturday is in honor of our 85-year-old friend Robert Pully, who adopted Ray and Rose, and drove them to doctors' appointments in Richmond and helped Ray set up booths at various fairs. Former manager of the Algonquin Hotel in New York, Robert, who died in January of this year, was dapper and funny and always encouraging. The day after the exhibit in Chapel Hill on April 17th, we will attend Robert's memorial service.

We are creating a "gratitude" list next week, but I can't sign off before mentioning the people at WUNC radio, especially Dick Gordon and Anita Woodley, who are extraordinary in their mission to share peoples' stories. Mary Anne Steinis, who offered Ray an exhibit two minutes after hearing about him, has turned this Saturday's opening into a community affair with people from her church pitching in. My sister and brother-in-law, Harriet and Dick Gaillard, have leapt in with both feet. They put me on to photographer Jill Batchelor and Jill in turn brought in Susan Reda, who put the word out.

I said to Mary Anne one day, "There is so little stress around all this. People step in at exactly the moment they are needed, and each time Ray has a financial crisis, another painting sells." "That is called grace," she said.

Ray said to me the other day, without a trace of self-pity, "Never once in my life have I received the respect that I am getting now."

"You deserve it, Ray," I said. But that is a blog for another day.

Until Mary Anne's website, is permanent, prints that you see on can be ordered directly from Mary Anne's gallery. The address and phone number is listed above. Her email will be provided tomorrow.

Heartfelt thanks to all of you who have entered this website. Please feel free to leave your comments and to let me know if you are having problems ordering prints,

Janet Hubbard

To purchase Ray's original paintings and Giclee prints of paintings featured, contact: MaryAnne, Framer's Market & Gallery owner
via phone 919-929-7137 or email:

Wednesday, April 7, 2010


Meet the artist at a wine and cheese reception
Come Enjoy Ray's Prints!
Sat. April 17, 2010
4:00-7:00 p.m.

To purchase Ray's original paintings and Giclee prints of paintings featured, contact: MaryAnne, Framer's Market & Gallery owner
via phone 919-929-7137 or email:

Janet's Hide Away

Framer's Market and Gallery
1728 Fordham Blvd., Chapel Hill, NC 27514
(Ram's Plaza)
(919) 929-7137

Boydton in 1964

Policeman Directing Traffic

Letter to Home

Tuesday, April 6, 2010


Go to to order prints or paintings from the gallery.